Women on TikTok are standing in for adult children without supportive parents

Women on TikTok are standing in for adult children without supportive parents

RONDAE Productions from Pexels via Canva
Women on TikTok are standing in for adult children without supportive parents.
When people get married they generally imagine their family being present. Dads walking them down the aisle, moms crying in the front row, pictures of their parents beaming with pride in official wedding photos. You know, the whole shebang. Sadly, not everyone gets to experience that. But don't worry as social media is helping adult children have a stand-in parent there for their big day.
Several creators on TikTok have offered to be stand-in parents for people who were disowned by their parents or whose parents had passed away. Everyone's favorite mom Mama Tot recently stood in for one of her tater tots' weddings , making the drive from her home state of Alabama up to North Carolina.
Another creator on TikTok is currently making plans to attend her now social media "adopted" son's wedding after meeting them for the first time recently. Upworthy caught up with Rosie, whose TikTok handle is north_omaha_cat_lady , to find out what spurred such a kind gesture.
Rosie spends most of her time working with children, but when she's not working she's creating content on TikTok supporting marginalized communities. The creator said that she's had an uptick in people reaching out to her telling her that their parents don't approve of their "lifestyle choices" and have disowned them. She said, "I don’t have kids and I just don’t understand how anyone could throw away a child."
Photo by Joshua Rawson-Harris on Unsplash
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Now that life is returning to normal (sort of!), people are finding it hard to fit in healthy meals amid a busy schedule. While the easiest solution may seem like grabbing fast food at a drive-thru or vending machine, that’s certainly not the healthiest choice.
Albertsons makes it easy to avoid falling into the fast food trap by offering O Organics® snacks and easy-to-prepare on-the-go meals, keeping bodies fueled and ready to run. But first? You have to make some sort of a plan, and then actually stick to it. Depending on your schedule and how many people live in your household, it may be beneficial to meal plan every week, making one large grocery list to prep lunches and dinners ahead of time.
If you don’t have time to walk the aisles of the grocery store, there’s the option of grocery pickup and/or delivery, the single most amazing invention of all time. Albertsons offers the option to create a profile based on your location, build shopping lists based on meal plans and recipes ( both are available on their website ), and a few clicks later, VOILA. Your order is ready for pickup!
Photo courtesy of Albertsons
For days when you know you won’t have much time between appointments to eat an actual meal, keep items in your bag or car like O Organics® mixed nuts , O Organics popcorn , O Organics fresh fruit , or protein bars. That will prevent you from getting hangry and whipping into the closest fast food chain. Items that need to be refrigerated, like string cheese, O Organics yogurt , and frozen meals, can be stowed in a refrigerator at work or school, or an insulated lunchbox.
Baby carrots with individually packaged containers of hummus or veggie dip is a great choice if you’re too busy to cook but also not behind the wheel of a car, because that particular snack requires both hands. Personally, I like to pack crackers and cheese, cucumber slices, and cherry tomatoes to snack on if I’m waiting in a parking lot (I find myself doing this a lot) or sitting at my desk, waiting for a Zoom call to start.
Photo courtesy of Albertsons
Another, more industrious option is to make a double batch of fiber-filled chewy chocolate chip cookies . This particular recipe includes quinoa and applesauce, so obviously they’re healthy. These cookies are delicious fresh out of the oven or for several days afterwards—you can even freeze them!
Main Ingredients
Photo by Blake Wisz on Unsplash
man buying item in shop
This article originally appeared on 08.15.18.
Have you ever wondered why people don't seem to say “you're welcome" anymore?
Back in 2015, author and professor Tom Nichols tweeted out an angry response after receiving what he thought was poor customer service:
“Dear Every Cashier in America: the proper response to 'thank you' is 'you're welcome,' not 'no problem.' And *you're* supposed to thank *me*"The angry tweet elicited a number of mocking responses from people on social media.
But eventually one person chimed in with a detailed and thoughtful response that just might give you pause the next time you or someone you know says, “no problem."
Dear Every Cashier in America: the proper response to "thank you" is "you're welcome," not "no problem." And *you're* supposed to thank *me*
— Tom Nichols (@Tom Nichols) 1442104313
\u201cDear Every Cashier in America: the proper response to "thank you" is "you're welcome," not "no problem." And *you're* supposed to thank *me*\u201d
— Tom Nichols (@Tom Nichols) 1442104313
woman facing on white counter
11.01.22
all photos provided by Coalition for The Homeless
Every night, the van delivers nourishment in all kinds of ways to those who need it most
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Homelessness in New York City has reached its highest levels since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Over 50,000 people sleep each night in a shelter, while thousands of others rely on city streets, the subway system and other public locations as spaces to rest.
That’s why this meal (and sock) delivery van is an effective resource for providing aid to those experiencing homelessness in New York City.
Every night of the year, from 7pm to 9:30, the Coalition for the Homeless drives a small fleet of vans to over 25 stops throughout upper and lower Manhattan and in the Bronx. At each stop, adults and families in need can receive a warm meal, a welcoming smile from volunteers, and a fresh, comfy new pair of Bombas socks. Socks may be even more important than you think.
Bombas was founded in 2013 after the discovery that socks were the #1 most requested clothing item at homeless shelters.
Access to fresh, clean socks is often limited for individuals experiencing homelessness—whether someone is living on the street and walking for much of the day, or is unstably housed without reliable access to laundry or storage. And for individuals experiencing or at risk of homelessness —expenses might need to be prioritized for more critical needs like food, medication, school supplies, or gas. Used socks can’t be donated to shelters for hygienic reasons, making this important item even more difficult to supply to those who need it the most.
Bombas offers its consumers durable, long-lasting and comfortable socks, and for every pair of Bombas socks purchased, an additional pair of specially-designed socks is donated to organizations supporting those in need, like Coalition for the Homeless. What started out as a simple collaboration with a few organizations and nonprofits to help individuals without housing security has quickly become a bona fide giving movement. Bombas now has approximately 3,500 Giving Partners nationwide.
Though every individual’s experience is unique, there can frequently be an inherent lack of trust of institutions that want to help—making a solution even more challenging to achieve. “I’ve had people reach out when I’m handing them a pair of socks and their hands are shaking and they’re looking around, and they’re wondering ‘why is this person being nice to me?’” Robbi Montoya—director at Dorothy Day House, another Giving Partner—told Bombas.
Donations like socks are a small way to create connection. And they can quickly become something much bigger. Right now over 1,000 people receive clothing and warm food every night, rain or shine, from a Coalition for the Homeless van. That bit of consistent kindness during a time of struggle can help offer the feeling of true support. This type of encouragement is often crucial for organizations to help those take the next difficult steps towards stability.
This philosophy helped Bombas and its abundance of Giving Partners extend their reach beyond New York City. Over 75 million clothing items have been donated to those who need it the most across all 50 states. Over the years Bombas has accumulated all kinds of valuable statistics, information, and highlights from Giving Partners similar to the Coalition for the Homeless vans and Dorothy Day House, which can be found in the Bombas Impact Report .
In the Impact Report, you’ll also find out how to get involved—whether it’s purchasing a pair of Bombas socks to get another item donated, joining a volunteer group, or shifting the conversation around homelessness to prioritize compassion and humanity.
To find out more, visit BeeBetter.com .
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