Upworthy Weekly podcast: UW's First Anniversary, Renting Out Your Spouse, Unpopular Parenting Rule

Upworthy Weekly podcast: UW's First Anniversary, Renting Out Your Spouse, Unpopular Parenting Rule

11.05.22
Upworthy Weekly podcast for November 5, 2022.
Alison and Tod celebrate their one-year anniversary by going over the show's brief history and controversial moments. Later, they look into things people enjoy as they age, an unpopular but effective parenting rule, and people share their biggest mistakes.
Plus, a woman rents out her “handy” husband and a montage of some of the show's best moments.
All photos courtesy of Biofinity Energys®
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The human eye reveals so much about who we are. One look can convey love, annoyance, exhaustion, or wisdom.
Our eyes tell the world if we are getting enough sleep, if we’ve been crying, or whether we are truly happy (or just faking it). When looking at the face, the eyes dominate emotional communication—after all, they’ve long been known as the “window to the soul.”
While humans can look each other in the eye and learn quite a bit with just a glance, our eyes also let us know when they’re tired of scrolling through Instagram or texting GIFS to our best friend…even if our brains are not (because let’s be honest, a well-placed GIF never gets old).
When our eyes are strained from looking at a digital device, they usually begin feeling dry, tired, and/or irritated.1 This is known as “ digital eye strain2 ,” something that can start to happen after only a few hours of looking at screens. Unfortunately, we can’t always stop what we’re doing—especially if we’re in the middle of teaching a class or giving a big presentation at work.
It’s a conundrum: our lives literally revolve around digital screens because we use technology for almost everything: work, school, play, communication, travel, banking, and news. But also, screens are taking a major toll on our eyes.
So what happens when our eyes have had enough, but there are still a lot of hours left in the day? There are several options recommended by eye care professionals, ranging from wearing blue light glasses to taking regular breaks and keeping your screen at the same level of brightness as your surroundings.
Another solution is Biofinity Energys® contact lenses. These contact lenses are designed for all-day wear, helping people's eyes better adapt so they can seamlessly and continuously shift focus between digital devices and offline activities. They are engineered with special Aquaform® Technology to lock in moisture, helping your eyes feel less dry. They’re also designed to help with eye tiredness (but you still need to take breaks!).
These monthly replacement contact lenses correct farsightedness or nearsightedness while simultaneously helping to reduce symptoms associated with digital eye strain, which is great for people like me who feel like they have to choose between blue light glasses or vision-correcting contacts just to get through a day at work!
Our eyes are obviously a very important part of our bodies, and we have to take care of them. If you’re interested in learning more about how these contact lenses can help your eyes feel less tired due to digital eye strain, head over to biofinityenergys.com to get your free trial certificate.
References
11.03.22
This article originally appeared on 07.11.17
Madalyn Parker wanted to take a couple days off work. She didn't have the flu, nor did she have plans to be on a beach somewhere, sipping mojitos under a palm tree.
Parker, a web developer from Michigan, wanted a few days away from work to focus on her mental health.
Parker lives with depression. And, she says, staying on top of her mental health is absolutely crucial.
"The bottom line is that mental health is health," she says over email. "My depression stops me from being productive at my job the same way a broken hand would slow me down since I wouldn't be able to type very well."
Photo courtesy Madalyn Parker
She sent an email to her colleagues, telling them the honest reason why she was taking the time off.
"Hopefully," she wrote to them, "I'll be back next week refreshed and back to 100%."
Soon after the message was sent, the CEO of Parker's company wrote back:
"Hey Madalyn,
I just wanted to personally thank you for sending emails like this. Every time you do, I use it as a reminder of the importance of using sick days for mental health — I can't believe this is not standard practice at all organizations. You are an example to us all, and help cut through the stigma so we can all bring our whole selves to work."
Moved by her CEO's response, Parker posted the email exchange to Twitter.
The tweet, published on June 30, 2017, has since gone viral, amassing 45,000 likes and 16,000 retweets.
"It's nice to see some warm, fuzzy feelings pass around the internet for once," Parker says of the response to her tweet. "I've been absolutely blown away by the magnitude though. I didn't expect so much attention!"
Even more impressive than the tweet's reach, however, were the heartfelt responses it got.
"Thanks for giving me hope that I can find a job as I am," wrote one person , who opened up about living with panic attacks. "That is bloody incredible," chimed in another . "What a fantastic CEO you have."
Some users, however, questioned why there needs to be a difference between vacation time and sick days; after all, one asked , aren't vacations intended to improve our mental well-being?
That ignores an important distinction, Parker said — both in how we perceive sick days and vacation days and in how that time away from work is actually being spent.
"I took an entire month off to do partial hospitalization last summer and that was sick leave," she wrote back. "I still felt like I could use vacation time because I didn't use it and it's a separate concept."
Many users were astounded that a CEO would be that understanding of an employee's mental health needs.
They were even more surprised that the CEO thanked her for sharing her personal experience with caring for her mental health.
After all, there's still a great amount of stigma associated with mental illness in the workplace , which keeps many of us from speaking up to our colleagues when we need help or need a break to focus on ourselves. We fear being seen as "weak" or less committed to our work. We might even fear losing our job .
Ben Congleton, the CEO of Parker's company, Olark , even joined the conversation himself.
In a blog post on Medium , Congleton wrote about the need for more business leaders to prioritize paid sick leave, fight to curb the stigma surrounding mental illness in the workplace, and see their employees as people first.
"It's 2017. We are in a knowledge economy. Our jobs require us to execute at peak mental performance," Congleton wrote. "When an athlete is injured, they sit on the bench and recover. Let's get rid of the idea that somehow the brain is different."
From Your Site Articles
All photos courtesy of Albertsons
True
Summer is officially over, which means we’re looking for any excuse to get together and watch a game or grill outside in the cooling temperatures.
The thing about hosting though is figuring out what to feed your guests—especially with rising prices all around. And frankly, everyone is sick of pizza.
Albertsons has you covered with fresh, organic ingredients to create delicious meals that cost under $5 per serving to create. The philosophy of their O Organics ® product line is “NON GMO. AND YES GTF (Great Tasting Food).”
All photos courtesy of Albertsons
Eating organic is good for your body and the planet, but it doesn’t have to break the bank. By following a few suggestions, you’re almost guaranteed to impress whatever crowd you’re serving: friends, family, colleagues, even a romantic interest.
You’ve got this in the bag, friend—so create a party playlist and get your cutting board ready.
Starting with appetizers, Roasted Tomato Salsa is a crowd favorite. It’s versatile and easy to customize and can be served with eggs for a festive brunch or with tortilla chips as a cure for the munchies while everyone waits for the main course. There is some prep work involved, so we recommend making the salsa ahead of time and storing it in the fridge. While the recipe doesn’t specifically call for organic tomatoes, organic Roma tomatoes can be swapped in or out, depending on your mood.
Another option is to pick up a few bags of O Organics® baby carrots, cherry tomatoes, celery and cucumbers to make a crudite tray. For a main course that is sure to please a crowd, Killer Beef Chili costs less than $3/serving to make, and can easily be morphed into taco salad if desired.
Main Ingredients
1 lb. lean (93/7) O Organics® ground beef
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt (divided into 1/2 tsp. and 1/4 teaspoon)
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 (6 ounce) can O Organics® Tomato Paste
2 (15 ounce) cans O Organics® Pinto Beans
2 cups fresh pico de gallo (from produce section)
2 cups water
Cooking Instructions
Step 1
Spray a 5-quart pot with nonstick cooking spray. Over medium high heat, brown ground beef, seasoning with 1/2 teaspoon salt and black pepper, about 4-5 minutes.
Step 2
Add garlic into beef and cook for about 30 seconds. Push all ingredients to one side of the pan and add chili powder to the cleared side. Stir to toast the seasoning, about 30 seconds. Add tomato paste to chili powder and toast, stirring constantly, about 2 minutes.
Step 3
Add remaining ingredients, stirring thoroughly to combine. Reduce heat to medium low, cover and let simmer for 10-12 minutes.
Step 4
Remove from heat and add remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt. Serve.
Don’t like beef or beans? No problem! Try our Spinach & Artichoke Quinoa Stuffed Peppers . These stuffed peppers make a great vegetarian main dish (to make it vegan, remove the cheese), and add cheery pops of color to any table. Pair with a simple salad and crusty bread, and it’s a whole meal.
Main Ingredients
3 bell peppers (any color)
1/2 cup O Organics® cooked quinoa
1 cup O Organics® baby spinach (chopped)
1/2 cup O Organics® cannellini beans (drained and rinsed)
1/2 avocado (diced)
1/2 cup quartered artichoke hearts (roughly chopped)
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese (plus more for topping)
Cooking Instructions
Step 1
Preheat oven to 450º. Cut bell peppers in half and remove seeds. Spray both sides lightly with olive oil spray. Place cut-side-down in a 9x13 baking dish. Bake for 10 minutes.
Step 2
In a medium bowl, combine all other ingredients with 1/2 cup of the cheese. Remove peppers from oven and scoop quinoa mixture into bell peppers. Top each with a tablespoon of shredded cheese.
Step 3
Turn oven down to 350º. Cover dish with foil and place back into oven for 15 minutes, until cheese is melted and quinoa mixture is hot.
If you’re looking for a few easy (or complicated!) side dishes, or maybe you’re thinking about hosting a lunch rather than a dinner, all you have to do is use the search bar in the Albertsons recipe database where you’ll find not only shopping lists, preparation instructions, and more, but you can also create a profile to order groceries for a fast and easy pickup.
From desserts to breakfast to lunchbox, O Organics® products are more than organic, it’s flavorful food that you can’t get enough of. Always grown without synthetic pesticides, O Organics produce is farmed to conserve biodiversity, USDA certified organic, and always non-GMO. Get to your nearest Albertsons today and load up! No Albertsons in your area? You can also find O Organics® products exclusively at Safeway, Vons, Jewel-Osco, ACME, Shaw’s, Star Market, Tom Thumb, Randalls, and Pavilions.
From Your Site Articles
Mark Wahlberg on "The Ellen Show."
This article originally appeared on 03.03.20
Actor Mark Wahlberg recently attended a daddy-daughter dance with his 10-year-old, Grace. Sadly, Grace had no interest in seeing her father strutting his stuff on the dance floor.
"I didn't get one dance," Wahlberg told Ellen DeGeneres. "And I told her we were going to do the whole big circle and I was going to go off. And she said, 'Dad, if you embarrass me, I will never talk to you again.' But what she did do is she hung out with me."
No matter who your dad is, especially if you're a 10-year-old-girl, you have zero desire to see him dance in front of your friends.
But the parents at the dance probably would have had a blast seeing Wahlberg bust out some of his old-school '90s Marky Mark moves.
However, Wahlberg couldn't help but leave his mark on the music being played at the dance.
Let's not forget, he didn't get famous for his acting but for showing off his abs in the "Good Vibrations" video.
Being that Wahlberg's time as a pop star was three decades ago, he couldn't believe it when he heard the music being played at the dance.
"[Grace] sat there on the edge of the stage, by the DJ. And then I'm sitting there with one other dad and I'm like, 'This is not an edited version of this song. There are explicit lyrics being played at a school dance for girls and I'm like no good,'" he said.
"I told the DJ and he's like, 'Oh, I thought it was.' I said, 'What are you doing?' I'm hearing F-bombs and this and that's not okay," Wahlberg said.
He's right. There's no place for music with explicit lyrics at a dance for 10-year-old children.
Wahlberg says the DJ didn't know he wasn't playing the edited version, but it's probably more likely that he didn't even realize the song was a problem. Pop music these days is filled with a numbing amount of violent and misogynistic lyrics.
A recent study from the University of Missouri found that nearly one-third of pop songs contain lyrics that degrade or demean women by portraying them as submissive or sexually objectified.
Currently, three of the top five songs on the Billboard Top 40 contain the word "bitch." One of them is sung in Korean.
It's odd that Americans have become more sensitive to misogyny in pop culture in films, television, and comedy, but still have a huge cultural blind-spot when it comes to music.
That's not a good thing, especially when pop music is marketed to teenagers.
"We know that music has a strong impact on young people and how they view their role in society," said Cynthia Frisby, a professor in the Missouri School of Journalism.
"Unlike rap or hip-hop, pop music tends to have a bubbly, uplifting sound that is meant to draw listeners in," Frisby continued. "But that can be problematic if the lyrics beneath the sound are promoting violence and misogynistic behavior."
Let's face it, pop stars are role models. Their examples show young people what to wear and how to behave. That's not to say that kids will blindly follow someone just because they like their music. But it has an undeniable effect.
Wahlberg, and any parent who monitors what their kids are listening to, deserve credit for protecting the minds and hearts of their kids.
Frisby has some great advice for parents concerned about negative imagery in pop music.
"Ask your daughters and sons what songs they like to listen to and have conversations about how the songs might impact their identity," Frisby said.
"For example, many songs might make young girls feel like they have to look and act provocative in order to get a boy to like them, when that isn't necessarily the case. If children and teens understand that what they are hearing isn't healthy behavior, then they might be more likely to challenge what they hear on the radio."
He's right. There's no place for music with explicit lyrics at a dance for 10-year-old children.
Wahlberg says the DJ didn't know he wasn't playing the edited version, but it's probably more likely that he didn't even realize the song was a problem. Pop music these days is filled with a numbing amount of violent and misogynistic lyrics.
A recent study from the University of Missouri found that nearly one-third of pop songs contain lyrics that degrade or demean women by portraying them as submissive or sexually objectified.
Currently, three of the top five songs on the Billboard Top 40 contain the word "bitch." One of them is sung in Korean.
It's odd that Americans have become more sensitive to misogyny in pop culture in films, television, and comedy, but still have a huge cultural blind-spot when it comes to music.
That's not a good thing, especially when pop music is marketed to teenagers.
"We know that music has a strong impact on young people and how they view their role in society," said Cynthia Frisby, a professor in the Missouri School of Journalism.
"Unlike rap or hip-hop, pop music tends to have a bubbly, uplifting sound that is meant to draw listeners in," Frisby continued. "But that can be problematic if the lyrics beneath the sound are promoting violence and misogynistic behavior."
Let's face it, pop stars are role models. Their examples show young people what to wear and how to behave. That's not to say that kids will blindly follow someone just because they like their music. But it has an undeniable effect.
Wahlberg, and any parent who monitors what their kids are listening to, deserve credit for protecting the minds and hearts of their kids.
Frisby has some great advice for parents concerned about negative imagery in pop music.
"Ask your daughters and sons what songs they like to listen to and have conversations about how the songs might impact their identity," Frisby said.
"For example, many songs might make young girls feel like they have to look and act provocative in order to get a boy to like them, when that isn't necessarily the case. If children and teens understand that what they are hearing isn't healthy behavior, then they might be more likely to challenge what they hear on the radio."
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