Consulting children and young people

Last updated: 08-20-2020

Read original article here

Consulting children and young people

Although most statutory consultations are geared towards people of voting age, that doesn't mean that children and young people can't be consulted. And they absolutely should be - especially in a time of such anxiety and stress regarding their futures - given that they're inheriting the Earth and all that.

Here are some organisations consulting children and young people at the moment.

GMCA have recently set up a task force to develop a Young Person's Guarantee in the Greater Manchester area. It's aimed at improving life and opportunities for 11-30 year olds in the area. This is one of two consultations - one on the topic of business, and the linked survey about wellbeing - relating to the Young Person's Guarantee open at the moment.

Why it's good: the survey is short but covers a lot of ground, thanks to a mix of matrix questions and open-ended questions. This is just one part of a wider programme of youth/community engagement that GMCA have planned to help inform development of the Guarantee, and it's always nice to see organisations taking coproduction values and principles on board.

Northamptonshire Council, in partnership with Public Health Northamptonshire and Northamptonshire CCG, are consulting children aged 5-19 about community healthcare and their general wellbeing. They're running two surveys: one for 5 - 10-year-olds and one for 11 - 19-year-olds.

Why it's good: Each survey has been written with the age bracket in mind, so many kids should be able to access the survey without relying on their parents' help. The questions aimed at the younger group are much simpler but should still provide a unique and valuable insight into Northamptonshire health services.

Redbridge are consulting young people in the borough about their experiences with bullying, past or present.

Why it's good: There are links to two charities supporting children regarding bullying on the overview page before a respondent clicks through to the survey. And having an anonymised outlet where a child can talk about experiences with bullying may well give them an opportunity to come forward if they didn't feel there was one before.


Read the rest of this article here