A Partnership for Children

A Partnership for Children

Wishing you all the best as the holiday season begins,
Teresa
 
Welcome our newly accredited members
In October, NCA's Board of Directors approved the accreditation applications of six CACs. Accreditation is a significant achievement. If your local CAC is on this list, please reach out to them to congratulate them on their commitment to helping the children in your community.
Vermilion County Child Advocacy Center, Danville, Illinois
Susie’s Place Child Advocacy Center – Terre Haute, Terre Haute, Indiana
East Mississippi Child Advocacy Center, Meridian, Mississippi
Over the Rainbow Children’s Advocacy Center, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania
Children’s Advocacy Center of Susquehanna and Wyoming Counties, Montrose, Pennsylvania
Children of the River Child Advocacy Center, Tacoma, Washington
What Accreditation Means
Visiting Children of the River Child Advocacy Center
We love the opportunity to visit CACs and say hello to our friends! NCA Grants Program Associate Faith Muddiman and Federal Grants Project Manager Sybil McIntyre were both in Washington state and got to tour the recently accredited Children of the River Child Advocacy Center , serving kids and families of the Puyallup Tribe in Tacoma.
From left to right: Children of the River Forensic Interviewer Carmelita Smith, McIntyre, Muddiman, and Children of the River Executive Director Laura Bluehorse-Swift.
 
Learn More About the CAC
Re-accredited CACs and Chapters prove their ongoing commitment to high standards of care
Every five years, Accredited CACs and Accredited Chapters must apply for re-accreditation. Our Board of Directors approved the following NCA members for re-accreditation in October:
Re-accredited CACs
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Zero Abuse Project works to make its name a reality
Many of you may have heard of the Zero Abuse Project . Some of you may even know that it is an organization committed to the elimination of child abuse. Its programs are designed to provide training and education to professionals and students, and to help transform institutions to effectively prevent, recognize, and respond to child abuse. But what you may not know is that “Zero Abuse” is more than just a name or a concept—in the words of Victor Vieth, Chief Program Officer, Education & Research, zero abuse is a “living, breathing principle. We have created a strategic plan to move the country to that goal—hence the name.”
 
The organization works toward that goal through a variety of innovative programs and trainings, designed to eradicate the root causes of child maltreatment—and include the entire community in the effort. Its programs are designed to provide cross-disciplinary education and training, advocacy for systemic legal change, guidance for survivor support, and leadership on emerging technologies.
 
What does Zero Abuse Project mean for your team, your state, and the children who reside there? The organization offers a menu of individual and team trainings from A to Z—or rather, A to Y: Adverse Childhood Experiences to Youth/Student Education—and everything in between. And Zero Abuse Project helped create the Child Advocacy Studies ( CAST ) Program, which is now being taught in over 90 universities and colleges as well as in law and medical schools and in seminaries. CAST focuses on developing students’ understanding of both the factors that lead to child maltreatment and the currently existing responses to incidents of child abuse and neglect, so they can work more effectively within multiple systems and institutions that respond to these situations. CAST students who complete the program will be better equipped to carry out the work of different agencies and systems, such as health care, criminal justice, and social services, as they advocate on behalf of the needs of children as victims and survivors of child abuse.
 
Perhaps one of the most innovative aspects of Zero Abuse Project is the way in which it weaves together the secular and the faith communities. In fact, the organization has a training specifically for clergy, chaplains, youth ministers, faith leaders, counselors, and other members of a faith community who may work with children or families impacted by child abuse. The training is called “ Keeping Faith: Empowering Faith Communities to Recognize and Respond to Child Abuse & Neglect .” Vieth talks more about that in the “ Faith, Trauma, and the Problem of Evil ” episode of our One in Ten podcast. As victims and survivors have come forward to detail allegations of abuse by religious leaders and in religious institutions, all too often the secular community has distanced itself from faith-based organizations—when, really, we need to be working together. The “ Keeping Faith ” training helps both communities work toward the overarching goal of ending child abuse.
 
And there’s so much more—Zero Abuse Project offers training to multidisciplinary teams and to forensic interviewers, and just received a renewal of its federal grant for the next three years to continue training for prosecutors and multidisciplinary teams and help improve the CAC model. Visit the Zero Abuse Project website to learn more about how you can become part of the strategic plan for ending child abuse in this country—and let’s all work together to achieve the vision of a world where every child is free from abuse.
 
Most webinars require an NCA Engage account to register. Visit the Getting Started page for instructions on signing up for an account.
Introduction to NCAtrak, November 2022
November 2-3, 2022 • 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. EDT both days
$500 per person; group discounts available
Advanced Custom Reporting with NCAtrak, November 2022
November 10, 2022 • 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. EST
$299 per person
Decision Guide for Multidisciplinary Teams on Addressing Problematic Sexual Behaviors
November 29, 2022 • 12:30-2:00 p.m. EST
Free to NCA members and their multidisciplinary teams
NCAtrak Office Hours, December
December 1, 2022 • 3:00-4:00 p.m. EST
Drop in any time during the hour to get answers to your questions about using the NCAtrak case management system • No preregistration required, just use the Zoom link from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. EST on December 1
Advanced TF-CBT: Using Play in TF-CBT
December 1, 2022 • 11:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. EST
$149 reduced rate; payment due by November 10
NCA grant funds cannot be used for payment
Attendance capped at 80 participants; your place in the class will be confirmed once payment is received • 5 continuing education credits • See course description for details and prerequisites
January 2023 three-day course: Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)
January 11-13, 2023 • 11:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. EST all three days
$450 reduced rate; payment due by December 12
NCA grant funds cannot be used for payment
Attendance capped at 50 participants; your place in the class will be confirmed once payment is received • 15 continuing education credits • See course description for details and prerequisites
Register for Jan. 11-13
Need help? Looking for your next step? The Job Forum is here.
The  Job Forum Community  is where CAC and Chapter staffing needs meet the community of qualified professionals. An NCA Engage account is required to post or read job openings, but any NCA member organizations or their partner agencies are welcome to post open positions. Contact us at membership@nca-online.org with questions about using the Job Forum. If you have questions about a specific job listing, please contact the organization that listed it. NCA does not verify listings.
Recent listings include:

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