The Development of Respect in Children and Adolescents

Last updated: 08-11-2020

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The Development of Respect in Children and Adolescents

Volume 85, Issue 3, Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development

Respect is paradoxical: its use vastly exceeds what is known about its origin and development. In this monograph, Tina Malti, Joanna Peplak, and Linlin Zhang explore children’s and adolescents’ thinking and feelings about respect. Using a novel mixed-method approach, the authors investigate how children and adolescents, ages 5, 7, 11, and 15 years, make meaning of and express respect toward others. Contrary to prominent developmental theories on respect, the findings reveal that respect across ages is predominantly viewed as a kindness virtue and thus ethical in nature. It becomes enmeshed in fairness concerns during adolescence. Overall, the findings suggest that respect is rooted in kindness and fairness, which may have implications for efforts aimed at nurturing well-being and relationships across childhood and adolescence.

Overview: The Development of Respect in Children and AdolescentsAuthors Tina Malti and Joanna Peplak provide an overview of the aims, methods, findings, and implications of their research in, “The Development of Respect in Children and Adolescents,” Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 85(3).

A Discussion on Respect with Dr. Tina Malti (Part I) In this video, the lead author of the SRCD Monograph issue 85.3, Tina Malti, In this video, Monograph Matters Associate Editor, Lauren J. Myers, sits with Tina Malti (University of Toronto) to discuss her issue of SRCD Monograph titled, “The Development of Respect in Children and Adolescents.” Dr. Malti details the goals, methods, and challenges of her work which examines how children’s and adolescents’ concept of respect develops.

A Discussion on Respect with Dr. Tina Malti (Part II) In part two of their discussion on respect, Monograph Matters Associate Editor, Lauren J. Myers, and lead author, Tina Malti (University of Toronto), discuss the key findings and implications of Dr. Malti’s work published in the SRCD monograph, “The Development of Respect in Children and Adolescents.”

Teaching and research materials are designed to be useful in various educational levels. Video, lecture slides, and classroom materials related to respect are appropriate for undergraduate and graduate classes on social development or research methods (e.g., how to interview children). Materials for K-12 teachers and other adults provide ideas for fostering conversations about respect with children and adolescents.


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