Childcare centers adjust to new protocols, while some facilities face economic hardship

Last updated: 06-20-2020

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Childcare centers adjust to new protocols, while some facilities face economic hardship

Childcare centers adjust to new protocols, while some facilities face economic hardship

Daycare centers throughout Kentucky are working toward a new normal, with smaller class sizes, temperature checks every morning, and other precautions designed to prevent the spread of COVID-19.“It’s the same as any industry right now, it’s the unknowns and the constant change,” said April Manning, director of St. Joe’s Child Development Center in Louisville. Part of the facility's new protocols include a carpool system where parents say goodbye at the door, rather than walking inside, taking the temperature of each child every morning, and class sizes have been reduced to ten children per teacher. “More frequent hand washing, more frequent sanitation of toys and linens," said Manning. “Overall everyone is adjusting real well.”Unfortunately other facilities that shut down for months may not be able to bounce back.“So when the pandemic hit, and childcare centers had to close, there’s no revenue coming in, no revenue means unless they have a savings, they have a really difficult time paying their mortgage, rent, maintaining employees is not an option,” said Brigitte Blom Ramsey, President and CEO of Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence.The committee worked with other Kentucky agencies to survey nearly 2,000 child care centers throughout the state.They learned 11 to 15 percent are at risk of closing. “Childcare is indeed a fragile ecosystem, it is an ecosystem that supports our youngest learners to be ready for school during the all important time of brain development from 0 to 5, it also supports Kentucky businesses so families have a place for their children to be while they’re working,” said Ramsey.Now as daycares work toward a new normal, the committee is calling on congress for a $50 million stimulus, specifically for childcare throughout the country.The committee also plans to survey parents, to help determine what they need most from childcare providers.

Daycare centers throughout Kentucky are working toward a new normal, with smaller class sizes, temperature checks every morning, and other precautions designed to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

“It’s the same as any industry right now, it’s the unknowns and the constant change,” said April Manning, director of St. Joe’s Child Development Center in Louisville.

Part of the facility's new protocols include a carpool system where parents say goodbye at the door, rather than walking inside, taking the temperature of each child every morning, and class sizes have been reduced to ten children per teacher.

“More frequent hand washing, more frequent sanitation of toys and linens," said Manning. “Overall everyone is adjusting real well.”

Unfortunately other facilities that shut down for months may not be able to bounce back.

“So when the pandemic hit, and childcare centers had to close, there’s no revenue coming in, no revenue means unless they have a savings, they have a really difficult time paying their mortgage, rent, maintaining employees is not an option,” said Brigitte Blom Ramsey, President and CEO of Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence.

The committee worked with other Kentucky agencies to survey nearly 2,000 child care centers throughout the state.

They learned 11 to 15 percent are at risk of closing.

“Childcare is indeed a fragile ecosystem, it is an ecosystem that supports our youngest learners to be ready for school during the all important time of brain development from 0 to 5, it also supports Kentucky businesses so families have a place for their children to be while they’re working,” said Ramsey.

Now as daycares work toward a new normal, the committee is calling on congress for a $50 million stimulus, specifically for childcare throughout the country.

The committee also plans to survey parents, to help determine what they need most from childcare providers.


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