Reducing Child Poverty

Last updated: 03-07-2020

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Reducing Child Poverty

This consensus study report from the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, released in February 2019, concludes that poverty causes negative outcomes for children, especially if it occurs in early childhood or persists through a large part of childhood. More than 9.6 million U.S. children live in families with annual incomes below the poverty line and studies estimate that child poverty costs the nation between $800 billion and $1.1 trillion annually in terms of lost adult productivity, the increased costs of crime, and increased health expenditures. The consensus study report identifies packages of policies and programs that could reduce child poverty by half within 10 years, at a cost far lower than costs the United States currently bears.

Friday, November 22, 2019Webcast of "A Dialogue on Racial/Ethnic Equity and Policy Proposals to Reduce Child Poverty Agenda Greg DuncanLisa GennetianNaomi ZewdePam JoshiMark Greenberg Webinar: Findings from the report National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and Brandeis University's Institute for Child, Youth and Family PolicyFederal Reserve Bank of Boston, 600 Atlantic Avenue, Boston, MA Greg Duncan   |  Lisa Gennetian   |  Naomi Zewde   |  Pam Joshi   |  Mark Greenberg Committee members Greg Duncan, University of California at Irvine, and Ron Haskins, Brookings Institution present findings from the report. LaDonna Pavetti, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, and Cara Baldari, First Focus, offer their reactions. Meetings of the Committee here...► 2nd Information Gathering Session, September 21, 2017 AGENDA HERE An ad hoc committee of experts will convene to conduct a consensus study of the costs of child poverty in the United States and the effectiveness of current efforts aimed at reducing poverty. The committee will review available high-quality research on current programs, with emphasis on evaluations that include benefit-cost analysis. Based on these analyses the committee will make recommendations for federal investment aimed at reducing the number of children living in poverty in the United States by half within 10 years. The committee will address five specific charges:1. Briefly review and synthesize the available research on the macro- and micro-economic, health, and social costs of child poverty, with attention to linkages between child poverty and health, education, employment, crime, and child well-being.2. Briefly assess current international, federal, state, and local efforts to reduce child poverty. The committee will provide an analysis of the poverty-reducing effects of existing major assistance programs directed at children and families in the United States, as well as relevant programs developed in other industrialized countries, such as the United Kingdom, Canada, and Ireland.3. Identify policies and programs with the potential to help reduce child poverty and deep poverty (measured using the SPM) by 50 percent within 10 years of the implementation of the policy approach.4. For the programs the committee identifies as having strong potential to reduce child poverty, the committee will provide analysis in a format that will allow federal policy makers to identify and assess potential combinations of policy investments that can best meet their policy objectives.5. Identify key, high-priority research gaps the filling of which would significantly advance the knowledge base for developing policies to reduce child poverty in the United States and assessing their impacts.Download the list here...► The Committee on Building an Agenda to Reduce the Number of Children Living in Poverty by Half in 10 Years held a second public information-gathering session on Thursday, September 21, 2017 from 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM at the National Academy of Sciences Building, 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, in Washington, DC.During the half day meeting, the committee had the opportunity to hear from invited speakers who discussed community-based approaches to reducing child poverty as well as contextual issues that have an impact on poverty reduction strategies. Members of the public also had an opportunity to ask questions or provide comments to the speakers and committee as time permitted.The meeting was free and opened to the public. Registrants had the option to attend in person or to participate via  the live webcast. See the detailed agenda HERE 1st Information Gathering Session, JUNE 20, 2017 AGENDA...► SPEAKERS PRESENTATIONS...► Archived Webcast, June 20, 2017 The Committee on Building an Agenda to Reduce the Number of Children Living in Poverty by Half in 10 Years held a public information-gathering session on June 20, 2017 from 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM at the National Academy of Sciences Building, 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, in Washington, DC. During this half day meeting, the committee had the opportunity to hear from invited speakers who presented ideas for programs and policies aimed at reducing short-run child poverty. Members of the public also had an opportunity to ask questions or provide comments to the speakers and committee as time permitted. See the AGENDA...► See the SPEAKERS PRESENTATIONS...►  

Board: Board on Children, Youth, and     Families (Lead); Collaborating Board: Committee on     National Statistics Committee Members ♦Bios Greg Duncan, Ph.D. (Chair) Distinguished Professor School of Education University of California, Irvine J. Lawrence Aber, Ph.D. Willner Family Professor of Psychology    and Public Policy New York University Dolores Acevedo-Garcia, Ph.D. Samuel F. and Rose B. Gingold Professor of Human Development and    Social Policy Director, Institute for Child, Youth and    Family Policy Brandeis University Janet Currie, Ph.D. Henry Putnam Professor of Economics    and Policy Affairs Chair, Department of Economics Director, Center for Health and    Wellbeing Princeton University Benard P. Dreyer, M.D., FAAP Professor of Pediatrics Director of Developmental-Behavioral     Pediatrics New York University School of    Medicine Director of Pediatrics, Bellevue    Hospital Center Irwin Garfinkel, Ph.D. Mitchell I. Ginsberg Professor of    Contemporary Urban Problems Interim Dean, Columbia University    School of Social Work Columbia University Ron Haskins, Ph.D. Senior Fellow in ES Brookings Institution Hilary Hoynes, Ph.D. Professor of Public Policy and    Economics Haas Distinguished Chair of    Economic Disparities University of California, Berkeley Christine James-Brown, B. A. President & CEO Child Welfare League of America Vonnie C. McLoyd, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology University of Michigan Robert Moffitt, Ph.D. Krieger-Eisenhower Professor    of Economics Johns Hopkins University Cynthia Osborne, Ph.D. Director, Center of Health and Social    Policy Director, Child and Research    Partnership Associate Professor of Public Affairs University of Texas at Austin Eldar Shafir, Ph.D. Class of 1987, Professor of Behavioral    Science and Public Policy Princeton University Timothy (Tim) Smeeding, Ph.D. Lee Rainwater Distinguished Professor    of Public Affairs and Economics University of Wisconsin-Madison Don Winstead, Jr., B.A. Principal and Founder Don Winstead Consulting, LLC    DHHS/ASPE Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Foundation for Child Development Marguerite Casey Foundation The Buffet Early Childhood Fund The W.K.Kellogg Foundation The Joyce Foundation William T. Grant Foundation Russell Sage Foundation


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