Without New Federal Money, California Child Care Providers Brace For Pay Cuts

Last updated: 10-04-2020

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Without New Federal Money, California Child Care Providers Brace For Pay Cuts

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2020 Census
City of LA and Other Plaintiffs Seek Sanctions Against Census Bureau
Updated
September 30, 2020 2:28 PM
Published
September 30, 2020 2:28 PM
A car caravan rolls through Oceanside to drum up support for the 2020 Census. (Caroline Champlin/LAist)
Plaintiffs in a lawsuit against the Trump Administration, including the City of Los Angeles, believe the government is still trying to end the 2020 Census early, even after a federal judge extended the count through October.
In a motion filed Wednesday, the plaintiffs argued for sanctions against the U.S. Census Bureau because the agency distributed a press release identifying Oct. 5 as a new target date to finish collecting responses.
“Defendants have violated this Court’s orders. The Court has inherent authority to compel compliance, and also has authority to find Defendants in contempt and/or to issue appropriate sanctions for non-compliance,” lawyers for the plaintiff’s wrote in their filing.
This is the latest update in a legal battle between the Trump Administration, several nonprofits and local governments that began more than a month ago, when the administration announced it planned to move up the end date for the census count by a month, from Oct. 31 to the end of September. Plaintiffs argued a shortened census would cause irreparable harm by undercounting hard-to-count local residents, like renters or immigrants. In the city of L.A., that’s more than half of all residents. Los Angeles County is considered especially hard to count .
Last week, Judge Lucy Koh agreed and ordered the Census Bureau to keep counting residents after Sept. 30, the early deadline abruptly chosen by the Trump administration. The government quickly appealed her order to the 9th Circuit Court -- a request that was rejected Wednesday .
When the U.S. Census Bureau announced Oct. 5 as a new target end date for the count this week, Judge Koh asked the agency to explain how that decision was made.
According to internal government documents, this date was chosen by the bureau in order to meet the legal deadline to have census data crunched, Dec. 31st. In her preliminary injunction order, Judge Koh enjoined the government from working toward that deadline.
In a case hearing yesterday, plaintiffs also pointed to the U.S. Census Bureau website, which at that time still listed the Sept. 30 deadline. In response to these developments, Judge Koh encouraged the plaintiffs to seek some penalty against the defendants.
“I just think that an entire schedule that’s predicted on an enjoined date is a violation of my preliminary injunction order,” Judge Koh said. “You don’t have to call it contempt, you can call it something else.”
The plaintiffs filed their motion today but decided against asking for defendants to be held in contempt of court. Instead, they've asked Judge Koh to reaffirm her earlier ruling by forcing the Census Bureau to send text messages to all census takers, informing them of the extension.
The plaintiffs are also asking for sanctions, specifically reports produced by defendants and Census Director Steven Dillingham to check the agency’s compliance. They also want the agency to reopen cases if they were counted according to any shortcuts made under the Trump Administration’s rushed census timeline.
MORE ON THE CENSUS:
LA Census Workers Say Thousands Of Angelenos May Be Left Uncounted
What's at stake for Southern California in the 2020 Census ? Billions of dollars in federal funding for programs like Medi-Cal, for public education, even disaster planning. Political representation in Sacramento and D.C. A census undercount could cut critical resources in L.A. County, home to the largest hard-to-count population in the nation.
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— Caroline Champlin
New Court Ruling Keeps Census Count Going, For Now
Updated
September 30, 2020 2:05 PM
Published
September 30, 2020 2:04 PM
A pamphlet with 2020 census information written in Spanish is included in a box of food to be distributed by the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank in Paramount last month. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
A federal appeals court in Northern California has denied the Trump administration's request to temporarily block a lower court order that extends the 2020 census schedule.
The Census Bureau must continue counting as ordered by the lower court for now, according to the new ruling by 9th U.S. Circuit Judge Johnnie Rawlinson and Judge Morgan Christen, who were part of a three-judge panel. Circuit Judge Patrick Bumatay dissented.
Rawlinson and Christen wrote in their order:
"Given the extraordinary importance of the census, it is imperative that the Bureau conduct the census in a manner that is most likely to produce a workable report in which the public can have confidence. The hasty and unexplained changes to the Bureau's operations contained in the Replan, created in just 4 to 5 days, risks undermining the Bureau's mission."
The move comes amid a complicated legal fight over the timeline for the constitutionally mandated head count, which is expected to be used to determine each state's share of seats in the House of Representatives, Electoral College votes and federal funding for the next decade.
READ THE FULL STORY FROM NPR:
LA Census Workers Say Thousands Of Angelenos May Be Left Uncounted
What's at stake for Southern California in the 2020 Census ? Billions of dollars in federal funding for programs like Medi-Cal, for public education, even disaster planning. Political representation in Sacramento and D.C. A census undercount could cut critical resources in L.A. County, home to the largest hard-to-count population in the nation.
Our news is free on LAist. To make sure you get our coverage: Sign up for our daily newsletters . To support our non-profit public service journalism: Donate Now.
— Hansi Lo Wang | NPR
Without New Federal Money, California Child Care Providers Brace For Pay Cuts
Updated
September 30, 2020 2:27 PM
Published
HOW ARE YOU TAKING CARE OF YOUR FAMILY?
Share your experience with LAist here -- we might use it in a story.
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— Mariana Dale
Dear Los Angeles: Your Parking Holiday Is Coming To An End
Updated
September 30, 2020 1:15 PM
Published
September 30, 2020 1:12 PM
A parking meter in Echo Park. Ticketing and parking is now scheduled to go back to normal on October 15, 2020. (Chava Sanchez/LAist)
We all knew it wouldn't last forever: The parking holiday is about to end in the city of Los Angeles.
The city put a hold on most parking enforcement when the pandemic began, to make it easier for Angelenos to stay home whenever possible.
But today, the City Council voted to resume normal enforcement on October 15. That means tickets for things like:
street cleaning
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— Megan Erwin
Judge Temporarily Blocks Steep Fee Increase For US Citizenship Application
Updated
September 30, 2020 12:52 PM
Published
September 30, 2020 12:42 PM
Immigrants await their turn for green card and citizenship interviews at a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) office in New York. (John Moore/Getty Images)
Major fee increases for citizenship and other immigration benefits were blocked late Tuesday under a nationwide injunction.
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services was set to increase the cost of applying for U.S. citizenship by more than 80%, from $640 to $1,170 , starting this Friday.
A federal judge with the Northern District of California issued a preliminary injunction putting the fee hike on hold, saying that the Trump Administration had failed to justify the increases as required by law. Also blocked were changes like a first-ever fee of $50 for those applying for asylum.
The judge also questioned the legitimacy of the fee increases under the acting secretary for the Department of Homeland Security, Chad Wolf, who was not properly appointed to the position.
The decision came as the result of a lawsuit filed this summer by a coalition of immigrant rights organizations.
Among the plaintiffs is the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles, whose executive director Angelica Salas told LAist that the steep fee hikes would have served only a small number of affluent immigrants, "the wealthy immigrants who can pay these enormous fees that determine these kind of legal benefits," she said.
"Legal petitions would be absolutely out of reach of moderate-income and low-income communities," Salas said.
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services is a "fee funded" agency and has raised fees for naturalization and other services in the past, but this citizenship fee increase was especially steep: The last time naturalization application fees increased in 2016, during the Obama administration, they went up about 21 percent.
In addition to fee increases, those who have already applied for U.S. citizenship in recent years have been facing much longer wait times .
MORE ON CITIZENSHIP FEES AND BACKLOGS:
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— LAist Staff
Election 2020
L.A. County Sees A Surge Of Young People Stepping Up To Be Poll Workers, But Some Volunteers Are Left Disappointed
Updated
September 30, 2020 1:09 PM
Published
September 30, 2020 12:40 PM
A sign outside a Los Angeles County vote center in Palmdale, CA on May 3, 2020. Libby Denkmann for LAist
Close to 17,000 workers are needed to operate L.A. County vote centers for the general election, and the Registrar-Recorder’s office says it’s already nearing its recruitment goal.
The county focused on enlisting election workers at local colleges -- and has already blown through its goal for applications, according to Supervisor Janice Hahn.
“We are making a much more concerted effort this year to recruit young people to be election workers, and it is paying off,” Hahn said.
But many would-be election volunteers say they’re still waiting to hear back about their applications. Some may have hit a technical roadbump when the county introduced a new online portal on Sept. 3.
READ THE FULL STORY:
California Nurse Practitioners Gain More Autonomy - In 2023
Updated
September 30, 2020 11:33 AM
Published
September 30, 2020 11:32 AM
Nurse practitioner Alexander Panis at a mobile COVID-19 testing station in Compton. (Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images)
A new law signed this week by Governor Newsom aims to ease California’s primary care shortage by allowing nurse practitioners to operate without a doctor’s supervision.
Nurse practitioners have masters or doctorates in nursing and other advanced training.
Until now, nurse practitioners were required to have a contract with a doctor and pay for oversight. The idea is that they can consult with the doctor if they need to, or in case of emergency. For years, nurse's groups said this requirement was unnecessary and needlessly cost thousands of dollars.
Under the new law, nurse practitioners will be able to see patients in their own practice, but only after working under a doctor's supervision for at least three years. California joins 38 other states that grant some level of autonomy to nurse practitioners — but it doesn’t take effect until 2023.
WHAT THE LAW DOES
AB 890 expands the role of nurse practitioners and allows them to practice independently in some settings, without a supervising physician. State Assemblyman Jim Wood (D-Healdsburg) pitched the bill as a way to help combat the state’s provider shortage .
WHO SUPPORTS IT?
Nurse practitioners have been trying to lift restrictions on their scope of practice for years. The nurses’ union as well as the state’s hospital association were among the bill’s supporters.
WHO’S OPPOSED?
California’s doctor lobby argued that the legislation posed a threat to patient safety and that it wouldn't necessarily guarantee growth in the provider workforce.
WHY IT MATTERS:
Nurse practitioners are highly trained nurses with a master’s degree, who work largely in primary care, an area of great need in the state. By some projections , California will need about 8,200 more primary care doctors by 2030.
GOVERNOR’S CALL:
Newsom signed this bill into law on Sept. 29.
Ibarra reports for Cal Matters
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— Jackie Fortiér and Ana. B. Ibarra
law enforcement
Suspect Charged In Ambush Shooting Of Two LA Sheriff's Deputies
Updated
September 30, 2020 1:47 PM
Published
September 30, 2020 11:04 AM
Sheriff Alex Villanueva speaking the night the two deputies were ambushed. (Josie Huang/LAist)
A Compton man who was arrested two weeks ago for carjacking has been charged with attempted murder in the Sept. 12 ambush shooting of two Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputies as they sat in their parked car at a metro station.
Deonte Lee Murray, 36, was scheduled for arraignment in Compton today, District Attorney Jackie Lacey told a news conference. If convicted, he faces a maximum sentence of life in prison, she said.
When asked what authorities know about a possible motive for the ambush, Sheriff's Capt. Kent Wegener, head of the homicide bureau, said, "Other than the fact that he obviously hates policemen and he wants them dead, not specifically."
Murray was already in custody facing attempted murder, robbery and carjacking charges for allegedly stealing a black Mercedes Benz sedan on Sept. 1, Lacey said. He pleaded not guilty to those charges and has remained behind bars.
Investigators had identified Murray as the suspect in the Sept. 1 carjacking, and as a potential suspect in the ambush at the Willowbrook Metro station, Wegener said. Deputies arrested Murray Sept. 15 after a chase that ended with him surrounded in a residential Compton neighborhood.
During that chase, Murray threw a pistol out of his car, Wegener said. It was recovered, and was found to be a 40 caliber "ghost gun" with eight bullets, five short of capacity — the same number of shots fired at the two deputies, he said.
Ballistics tests determined that it was the gun used in the ambush, and forensic tests "conclusively linked" the weapon to Murray, Wegener said. Other video evidence showed that Murray was in the area of the ambush "a period of time prior to the shooting," he added.
Murray has a criminal record that includes convictions for burglary, terrorist threats, drug sales and illegal possession of firearms, Wegener said. He said authorities are not releasing a photo of Murray because they're still interviewing witnesses, and because the judge in Murray's carjacking case ordered that his photo not be released.
Murray "is associated with a couple of different gangs," Wegener said, while declining to name the gangs.
Despite authorities saying they're unsure about a motive for the ambush, Sheriff Alex Villanueva put the incident in the context of an "overall increase in brazen attacks on law enforcement," as well as incidents during the protests of recent months in which he said some people threw rocks and bottles at officers.
The two deputies who were shot, a 31-year-old female and a 24-year-old male, are both recovering at home, Villanueva said. They both face a lot of reconstructive surgery and a lengthy rehabilitation, but they're "fortunately doing ok," he said.
This story has been updated.
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— robert garrova
How Did Moreno Valley’s Retired City Manager Make $600,000 This Year?
Updated
September 30, 2020 7:54 AM
Published
September 30, 2020 6:31 AM
Tom DeSantis announced in December that he was leaving his job at Moreno Valley City Hall. Keith Plocek
Being the city manager in Moreno Valley is a lucrative gig. No longer being the city manager of Moreno Valley is also a lucrative gig, judging from the payouts given to the last two people to hold the job.
Michelle Dawson made $590,000 in 2018, thanks to a clause in her contract that granted her a full additional year of pay if she were terminated without cause. Her successor, Tom DeSantis, did even better, making $600,000 this year even though he retired in December 2019.
That payout has some Moreno Valley residents wondering just why DeSantis got so much money if he’s the one who decided to leave.
“When you retire, that’s it,” said lifelong Moreno Valley resident Debra Craig. “You get nothing, right?”
Craig has filed a lawsuit in Riverside Superior Court against DeSantis and the city, alleging “a gift of public funds” that was in violation of the law. Regardless of how that case turns out, there are still plenty of unanswered questions about the circumstances surrounding DeSantis’ retirement, and no one at Moreno Valley City Hall is talking.
As an undergrad at USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, I spent two months this summer poring over public records and adding up the numbers of DeSantis’ deal. The details are striking.
READ THE FULL STORY
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— Myra Wu
Mental Health Peer Support Gains Traction In California
Updated
September 30, 2020 6:20 AM
Published
September 30, 2020 6:05 AM
Keris Jän Myrick, chief of peer and allied health professions for L.A. County’s Department of Mental Health. (Robert Garrova/LAist)
L.A.’s mental health peer support services may get a boost in the form of a new law signed by Governor Newsom last week.
The idea behind peer support is simple: people who know what it’s like living with a mental illness helping others with their psychiatric condition. But backers like Keris Jän Myrick , chief of peer and allied health professions for L.A. County’s Department of Mental Health, say it’s time to take the model seriously.
“It’s hard to navigate everything, so [it helps] having somebody who’s been through [it] and they’re kind of like your GPS,” Myrick said.
The new law paves the way to expand the use of peer providers by creating a certification process and opening up the possibility for pilot projects funded by Medi-Cal.
READ OUR FULL STORY ON PEER SUPPORT IN L.A.:
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— Robert Garrova


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